kwik sew 2785 overalls

kwik sew 2785 overalls

There’s something about my boys and overalls. I like it when they wear them, they don’t — at first. Both Spud and FB staged overall boycotts immediately upon receiving their first pair; then, once the stalemate ends (their choice), I can’t sew fast enough to keep up with demand.

The Facts

The Pattern: Kwik Sew 2785
The Fabric: medium-weight red-striped denim from Fashion Fabrics Club
Size: 2T, lengthened

kwik sew 2785 overalls

The Pattern

Having sewn four or five pair of these overalls, I was still happy with how nicely these came together. Kwik Sew 2785 is certainly not sew-it-in-an-evening type of pattern, but the end result is a quality garment. I sewed these in about a week of sitting down and sewing whenever I had a free window of time.

As I so often do, I was sewing in a race against growth spurts; I cut these out before Christmas and thankfully had the forethought to add length to the size 2T. They fit my just-turned-3 FB quite well. After threading the straps through the buckles, I always leave the ends unsewn which makes it easier to adjust them on the fly.

kwik sew 2785 overalls (4)

The Fabric

I bought this denim a couple of years ago after scouring fabric stores and online shops for railroad stripe denim. This was all I could find, and then not long after, I started seeing Robert Kaufman’s Railroad Denim everywhere. I often tend to be ahead of the curve for some reason, but I promised myself I wouldn’t buy any blue and white railroad stripes until I used this yardage up. One more pair of overalls to go and then we’ll see.

Even though this fabric wasn’t exactly what I wanted, it was perfect for this project–a sturdy denim with a little stretch, and the red stripes are unique. My just-returned-from-the-repair-shop serger finished off the seams without a hitch and I’ve washed these three times without a hint of raveling.

kwik sew 2785 overalls

 

kwik sew 2785 overalls

Another happy overall convert. He likes the pockets, I liked the excuse to topstitch in red. This year’s garden season will give them a real workout. Spud can’t wait for me to finish his pair.

 

 

embroider smarter: get the most out of your sulky sticky fabri-solvy scraps

embroider smarter: use your sulky sticky fabri-solvy scraps

 

Recently I’ve been using Sulky Sticky Fabric-Solvy (read my review here) for many of my embroidery projects lately, and while I love the product, I want to get my money’s worth out of every bit of it.

After a bit of experimenting, I’ve come up with a way to maximize the scraps I have left over after I’ve printed off larger designs.

MATERIALS

  • Sulky Sticky Fabri-Solvy scraps
  • tape
  • digitized version of the embroidery design you want to print
  • scissors
  • printer

PROCESS

In the photos below, you’ll see how I used this method to transfer letters for my Padded Knee Patches.

embroider smarter: use your sulky sticky fabri-solvy scraps

The outlined letters above are the ones I used as my template–the bold letters on the reverse side were earlier test prints.

 

 

1.  Print off the design you want to transfer on regular printer paper. This will serve as a template to show you where to position your Fabri-Solvy scraps. Make sure you pay attention to the direction your printer feeds the paper (if you don’t already know).

Tip: If you want to transfer a design that is not digitized, scan it or take a photo of it, then import it into a Word (or similar) document and you’ll be ready to follow these steps.

embroider smarter: use your sulky sticky fabri-solvy scraps

2.  Cut a Fabri-Solvy shape from scraps that is slightly larger than the design printed on the paper. A 1/2″ “seam allowance” should be plenty. Center the Fabri-Solvy over the design (hold up to a window or put on a lightbox if needed) and tape down securely on all four sides.

embroider smarter: use your sulky sticky fabri-solvy scraps

3.  Load the paper (with Fabri-Solvy taped on) into the printer so that the design will print on the Fabri-Solvy. Hit print. If everything goes as planned the paper will emerge with your design printed on the Fabri-Solvy directly above where it printed originally was printed on the paper.

**I have not had any problems with the taped Fabri-Solvy hangning up in my printer (but all printers are different), even when I was first trying this out. The key is to make sure the Fabri-Solvy has no wrinkles and the tape is pressed down firmly.**

embroider smarter: use your sulky sticky fabri-solvy scraps

embroider smarter: use your sulky sticky fabri-solvy scraps

4.  Cut around the edge of the Fabri-Solvy (and through as much of the tape as possible). The paper and Fabri-Solvy should separate, and now you can transfer your design as usual.

P.S.–Have you signed up for the ThimbleNest newsletter yet? Subscribers receive a free hand embroidery pattern each month. Sign up here!

tutorial: padded knee patches

tutorial padded knee patches | www.thimblenest.com

tutorial padded knee patches | www.thimblenest.com

We received a large supply of hand-me-downs for Spud and FB last week. In going through the clothes I discovered a few pairs of pants that were fine except for small holes or wear in the knees. After my success with extending too-short, holey-kneed pants, I was ready to tackle patches.

tutorial padded knee patches | www.thimblenest.com

FB has been showing an interest in left vs. right, and the teacher in me just can’t pass up an opportunity for learning. So, I incorporated a little reminder into his knee patches. This project just happened to coincide with Elsie Marley’s latest #thecreativityclub challenge: Visible Mending.

tutorial padded knee patches | www.thimblenest.com

Here’s the tutorial I put together on how I sewed the knee patches. Embroidery/embellishment is optional. A printable one-sheet instructions-only version of the tutorial follows the photos.


Click here for the printable instructions-only page.

P.S.–Have you signed up for the ThimbleNest newsletter yet? Subscribers receive a free hand embroidery pattern each month. Sign up here!